North Carolina's Court Gives Life Sentences For Teenager Who Killed Parents
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North Carolina’s Court Gives Life Sentences For Teenager Who Killed Parents

| January 3, 2024

An appeals court in the state of North Carolina has upheld a prison sentence. The prison sentence concerns a young fellow who got the prison sentence without parole. He faces jail time for murdering his own parents.

The Court of Appeals went on to announce the said prison sentence with a decision through a 2-1 panel. The judges even affirmed that the prison sentencing of Mr. Tristan N. Borlase was indeed for two counts of first-degree. He carried out the murders in 2019 and was sentenced in 2022.

Borlase, almost 18 at the time. He brutally attacked his mother, Tanya Maye Borlase and Jeffrey David Borlase, his father. This took place in April 2019. The trial judge reviewed all other factors involved in the crime before declaring the sentences.

The divided panel’s decision confirmed the severity of Borlase’s crimes. This lead to his life imprisonment without any possibility of parole for the tragic incident involving his parents.

In their Watauga County home, evidence revealed his mother suffered stabbing, strangulation, and blunt force. On the other hand, his father was stabbed outside. That day, they disciplined him for a poor high school report.

Apparently, they were disappointed that he might not graduate. Trying to hide his actions, Borlase concealed their bodies and cleaned the scene before being found in Tennessee a day later.

Though tried as an adult, Borlase’s age limited his sentence to life without parole. North Carolina law now lets defendants show how their youth, family pressures, and rehab potential can affect sentencing. Borlase’s lawyer argued his cruel punishment rights were violated by two life sentences without parole.

They claimed the judge didn’t fairly consider Borlase’s circumstances. The majority opinion backed the judge’s decision, saying it wasn’t random and had proof.

Thus, they claimed that Borlase’s troubled family dynamic and personal struggles weren’t being considered. An appeal to the state Supreme Court is an option, but new laws changed how split decisions are handled.

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Debkanya Bhattacharya
Debkanya Bhattacharya

Debkanya is a lawyer turned writer. With an experience of 3 years, she is your go-to source for all things law. She has a soft corner for the US and international section. When the weekend arrives, you'll find her reading up on politics, Austen, or travel blogs over a cup of coffee.

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